Former Lord Chancellor Ken Clarke:

“I do not believe the public understand a system that can pay out millions of pounds from taxpayer- provided central funds to compensate acquitted companies and wealthy people for their legal costs, whether that involves the £21 million paid to the firms in the Hatfield rail crash case, the £18 million paid to a number of pharmaceutical firms accused of price fixing, or the hundreds of thousands of pounds that have on occasion gone to celebrities accused of affray, assault and other crimes. Part 2 of [LASPO] therefore establishes that defendants who decline legal aid and pay privately in the higher criminal courts will no longer be able to recover the costs of an expensive private lawyer if acquitted[…]” (HC Debate, 29 Jun 2011, c995 – with one Nigel Evans in the Speaker’s chair…)

So does Nigel Evens want parliament to repeal the act he supported, that denies the acquitted recuperation of defence costs if not legally aided, or just exemption for himself?

So does Nigel Evens want parliament to repeal the act he supported, that denies the acquitted recuperation of defence costs if not legally aided, or just exemption for himself?

This act came into force on the 29th July 2013
UNISON announces appeal over employment tribunal fees

"There is absolutely no doubt that the Government’s decision to introduce fees has destroyed access to justice. 
"The fall in the number of tribunal claims being lodged is staggering and these latest figures give the Government nowhere to hide.

"We have argued all along that there can be no price placed on justice, but the sad fact is that this is exactly what is happening."
– Dave Prentis, General Secretary of UNISON

This act came into force on the 29th July 2013

UNISON announces appeal over employment tribunal fees

"There is absolutely no doubt that the Government’s decision to introduce fees has destroyed access to justice. 

"The fall in the number of tribunal claims being lodged is staggering and these latest figures give the Government nowhere to hide.

"We have argued all along that there can be no price placed on justice, but the sad fact is that this is exactly what is happening."

– Dave Prentis, General Secretary of UNISON

Which might explain why Boris Johnson is tooling up the Metropolitan Police with two second-hand water cannons from Germany at a cost of £200,000.
Rebecca Newsom, of the campaign group No to Water Cannon told HuffPost UK in a statement: "We know that water cannon is both ineffective and dangerous, yet Boris Johnson has decided to give it the green light.
"The Mayor is clearly happy to ignore the public consultation results. He seems to be ignorant to the risks of this weapon, admitting this morning that he failed to read the report against the plans by his own Police and Crime Committee"
Boris Johnson Approves Use Of Water Cannon For London Police, On Budget Day | Huffington Post

Which might explain why Boris Johnson is tooling up the Metropolitan Police with two second-hand water cannons from Germany at a cost of £200,000.

Rebecca Newsom, of the campaign group No to Water Cannon told HuffPost UK in a statement: "We know that water cannon is both ineffective and dangerous, yet Boris Johnson has decided to give it the green light.

"The Mayor is clearly happy to ignore the public consultation results. He seems to be ignorant to the risks of this weapon, admitting this morning that he failed to read the report against the plans by his own Police and Crime Committee"

Boris Johnson Approves Use Of Water Cannon For London Police, On Budget Day | Huffington Post

Over the last six months I have visited hospitals all over the country. I have met patients and relatives, doctors, nurses and managers. I have seen with my own eyes what is going on in our NHS.

It is, in the words of a senior doctor at the British Medical Association, the worst financial crisis in the NHS for ten years.

So, if your hospital is in crisis - blame the Conservatives - of course you should.

Leader’s speech to the Spring Party Conference, Cardiff 1997 by Paddy Ashdown, 50 days before the General Election that removed John Major’s Conservative Government from power.

The Conservatives almost destroyed the NHS last time they had power. Will they succeed this time?

NHS fees plan is a turning point in privatisation

The kite flown by a rightwing thinktank that everyone should have to pay for access to healthcare (£10 each can save the NHS, 31 March) marks a crucial turning point in switching towards a fully paid-for health service. This process has been long planned. First Blair encouraged and then pressured NHS hospitals into becoming independent foundation trusts, self-standing suppliers within a competitive market. Cameron took this much further by ruling that all NHS functions would be open to tender by any qualified provider. The Lansley health and social care bill, hatched in deepest secrecy before the 2010 election with not a word about it in the Tory manifesto so that it had no electoral mandate, opened the floodgates for full-scale privatisation of the NHS. But always the mantra was repeated that the NHS would remain “free at the point of service”. Now that assurance is being kicked away.

The thinktank authors decry the NHS as “an outdated, cosseted and unaffordable healthcare system”. They don’t mention that the Tory government has deliberately imposed a £20bn cut in NHS funding over the current five-year period to put it under intolerable strain and maybe breakdown in order to pave the way for a gradual switch to a fully paid-for private service, which has always been their secret aim, just like before 1948. Nor do they mention that the NHS, at a cost of 8% of GDP, is the most cost-efficient in the world, half the comparative cost of the private US healthcare system.

We now see why the Tories have been so keen to demean the NHS on every occasion over the past few months. Cue the need to junk the old, failing NHS and announce the dawn of a brand-new, burnished private healthcare system – and at a bargain price of £10 a month. But remember tuition fees: capped at £3,000, then trebled. If every UK adult paid £10 a month, this new tax would raise £5.4bn. Treble that, or more, and we’re talking serious money for the healthcare privateers.

Michael Meacher MP
Labour, Oldham West and Royton

A man has walked the streets in a ‘f*ck the poor’ sandwich board as part of a social experiment looking at how far the public really care about the less fortunate.

Explaining what happens in the video would only serve to ruin its effect, so play it now.

Watched it? Good. Continue reading the Independent article.